Retirement calculator

Tell us a few things about yourself, and this calculator will show whether you're on track for the retirement you want.

I am
35
years old,
my pre-tax income is
$60,000
and I have current savings of
$30,000

Every month I save

10% of my monthly income

Optional

How much will you need to retire at 67?

$0.88M
You will have about
$1.73M
You will need about

Tap the bars to reveal more about your results.

Retirement savings score

You're 51% to goal
Needs attention
On your way
Getting close
On track

Let’s get Future You out of the red.

There are a few steps you could take to jumpstart your retirement savings. Create an account to reduce your bills, eliminate debt and grow your money.

How we got here

Our calculator predicts your retirement nest egg in today’s dollars, then sees how it would stretch over the years you plan to spend in retirement, taking inflation into account. Our default assumptions include:

  • A 3% inflation rate

  • Salary increases of 2% per year

  • A 5% rate of return in retirement (assuming a more conservative portfolio)

Make adjustments in the basic settings to reflect your current situation. Under optional settings, you can add what you expect from Social Security (get an estimate here). You can also fine-tune your retirement spending level and adjust other assumptions.

Want to boost your score? Here’s how

Here are some ways to boost your retirement readiness — whether you’re behind on your goals or are on track but maybe want to retire a little earlier.

“My score needs attention.”

An individual retirement account is one of the most popular ways to save for retirement given its large tax advantages. You can put in up to $5,500 a year. » Learn more about opening an IRA

“On my way, but I could close the gap.”

The annual limit here is $18,500, but at least contribute to the point where you’re getting all matching dollars your employer offers. » See about increasing your 401(k) contributions

“I’m on track, but I want to do more.”

A good advisor can help you understand complex issues, diagnose potential problems and take steps to plan for the future. And they’re not as expensive as you might think. » Learn how to choose a financial advisor

How much money do you need to retire?

A common guideline is that you should aim to replace 70% of your annual pre-retirement income. You can replace it using a combination of savings, investments, Social Security and any other income sources (part-time work, a pension, rental income, etc.). The Social Security Administration website has a number of calculators to help you estimate your benefits.

It’s important to consider how your expenses will change in retirement. Some, like health care and travel, are likely to increase. But many recurring expenditures will go down: You no longer need to dedicate a portion of your income to saving for retirement. You may have paid off your mortgage and other loans. And your taxes are likely to be lower — payroll taxes, which are taken out of each paycheck, will be eliminated completely.

Be sure to adjust based on your retirement plans. If you know you won’t have a mortgage, for instance, maybe you plan to replace only 60%. If you want to travel every year, you might aim to replace 100% or even 110% of pre-retirement income.

Using this retirement calculator

First, enter your current age, income, savings balance and how much you save toward retirement each month. That’s enough to get a snapshot of where you stand.

Want to customize your results? Expanding the Optional settings lets you add what you expect to receive from Social Security, adjust your spending level in retirement, change expected retirement age and more.

Hover over or tap on the color bars in your results panel to get further insight into where you stand.

You can adjust your inputs to see how various actions, like saving more or planning to retire later, might affect your retirement goals.

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